Writing in standard form

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Been meaning to update this one for a while. The old ones were not good.

Firstly, I’ve gone for FRESH NEW LOOK

I am trying to do some more etymology stuff this year, so I’ve got a dedicated bit talking about it. Mainly, I’ve got rid of the big picture and the learning objective (which was usually just the title anyway). I’ve also tried to minimise my use of dark bits as you’ll see.

These animate in. I think it’s really interesting to be specific. Talk about what is and isn’t standard form. In my early teaching career I definitely rushed through stuff and it makes me cringe a bit.

Obviously before you do this, you need to tell them what standard form is!

Then we do an example problem pair and then this

I love moving between different forms and having to think backwards. Blocking out the tables is always good. I also like getting students to write out the full expanded form.

I do the same for negative indices and then I added this


I think it’s important that we don’t lose the point of standard form, which is easy comparison of numbers and scale. All that stuff like Scale of the Universe (https://htwins.net/scale2/) which makes this topic cool!

Please hit me up on Twitter if you have feedback or comments!

Richard